Whitby

Beyond the yachts, a glimpse of the Whitby Swing Bridge over the River Esk in Whitby, North Yorkshire, England. Apart from its links to Dracula, the town is also famous for Captain Cook who moved there from Staithes where he had been an apprentice to a draper. The young man was besotted by the sea,Continue reading “Whitby”

Pavilion for Scandal

The magnificent Royal Pavilion, aka the Brighton Pavilion, was created for the Prince Regent during the madness of his father, George III. Building, to the design of architect John Nash, heavily influenced by Indian Mughal influenced architecture, began in 1815, and contrary to what one might assume, conceals an interior theme of Chinoiserie – theContinue reading “Pavilion for Scandal”

Neoclassical Colonnade

Nine of the sixteen fluted Corinthian columns fronting the Neoclassical St George’s Hall. Standing opposite Lime Street railway station in the centre of Liverpool, England, the impressive hall was designed by Harvey Lonsdale Elmes, who oversaw its construction until he died of consumption in 1847. In 1851 another architect, Sir Robert Charles Cockerell, was askedContinue reading “Neoclassical Colonnade”

Stormy day on Brighton Pier.

Brighton Palace Pier emanates an old fashioned British seaside charm even in the midst of wild, wet, windy weather – and despite the climate remains popular, with over four million visitors per year (in normal times). Since opening in 1899, the pier has been featured in many works of British culture, including the gangster thrillerContinue reading “Stormy day on Brighton Pier.”